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One of the tasks a webmaster often faces with trepidation is moving content around without taking a hit from Google. So many have expressed this that the official Google webmaster blog has addressed it in the post on Making Site Moves Easier.

3 Kinds of Content Migration

There’s really just two basic categories of site move, but since the second group has two subdivisions, there may as well be three:

  • site moves without URL changes
  • site moves with URL changes
  • site moves to responsive web design

Each kind of move will mean following different instructions, and Google does a good job of explaining the steps.

The Price of Site Moves the Wrong Way

It may seem like there’s no consequence to just shifting around your content on your site on the human level. After all, if your site is logical to you changes will probably will be logical to your customers who are regular users. But the search engines are not reading your site on the human level, and that will affect where your site comes up in the page ranks.

Humans tend to do a search and look at the first page or so. If you want new users, you will need to be found. Moving content around without keeping an eye on the Googlebot will change the way your site comes up on Google. That will change who sees your site.

It makes sense to follow Google’s instructions when you do site moves because then you will be doing things the way their search engine operates, and that improves your chances to be where you want to be in the rankings.

For more insights on web design, visit reciprocalconsulting.com/web-design.php

If you could see a building’s skeleton, you’d see triangles. The three sides of this basic shape are ideally suited to holding up a lot of weight, because each side supports the other sides.

The Three Sides Of The Reputation Triangle

Online reputation management has three sides, too, and they each support the other. Just like the triangles in the girders of the skyscraper, this basic shape does the work of supporting a lot of weight so that a business can be built to last.

  • Side 1: Proactive Reputation Management – This is the stuff you put out there, on your site, in social media, advertising, etc. Most businesses will be very careful to construct a positive reputation online and this is where many stop. It’s important, it’s foundational, but it isn’t enough because it is only one side of the equation for strength.
  • Side 2: Online Reputation Management Monitoring – Another side of the triangle’s strong shape is the ongoing attention to what is being said about your business. This can change with one disgruntled employee or customer who posts a negative review and snowballs into vindictive rhetoric on a forum. Other times it will be positive recommendations from satisfied customers. Negative or positive, it all has to be monitored or you won’t know what is going on.
  • Side 3: Reactive Reputation Management – The third side of the triangle is the steps taken to repair damage when it happens. It’s easier to fix a leak at the beginning than it is after the flood, and it’s easier to fix a reputation issue when it starts.

If the first two sides of the reputation management triangle are in place, you’ll be able to quickly respond to a problem and deal with it. Action taken depends on what is happening and can be anything from diplomatically calming an irate customer to correcting misinformation on a blog to legal action when appropriate.

It Takes All Three Sides To Be Strong

Kids in science class take toothpicks and make triangles, then use those triangles to build strong supportive structures that hold far more weight than a single toothpick can carry. The strength of the triangle depends on all three sides supporting the others, and the strength of your reputation is dependent upon all three sides of the online reputation management triangle.

For more insights on online reputation management, visit http://www.reciprocalconsulting.com/online-reputation-management.php#2

The vast majority of people need a picture…visual aids to understanding content. This is why you are seeing more infographics being used to explain things. Aleyda Solis does a great job of giving us a picture in The Illustrated SEO Competitive Analysis Workflow. The infographic lays out the process of identifying SEO targets and figuring out how you are going to develop your strategies in four steps.

The picture helps us understand a complicated thing: SEO competitive analysis is a subject that very few of us get a good grasp on at first. But this excellent infographic is in the middle of words explaining and enhancing our understanding of the picture.

We Need More Than Pictures

The visual catches our attention and helps us understand the content of a page, but without words we are interpreting the picture by our own perspective. In order to really understand SEO competitive analysis, you’d have to do a little more:

  • read expanded information
  • act on the suggestions using the chart as a guide
  • come back with questions and get answers
  • repeat

SEO Is Part Of A Bigger Picture

All the pieces of the puzzle are needed to give you the chance to see the picture it will create, and they have to be put together correctly first. Most of us need to see the picture on the jigsaw puzzle box while we are working on the puzzle because it helps us figure out where the pieces go. (Those who refuse to look at the picture have other priorities.)

Infographics like the one Ms. Solis did for Moz on SEO Competitive Analysis are great for helping us put the pieces of the puzzle together correctly. It’s a good reminder that people need visuals to help them understand content. It’s also a good reminder that SEO doesn’t exist in a vacuum but in a context, like a puzzle piece in a box with a picture on the lid.

For more about SEO and the context in which it exists, see reciprocalconsulting.com/internet-marketing-services.php#3

 

 

Competition is a funny thing. Have you ever seen that crazy game where an onion is passed around as music is played? When the music stops, the onion holder must take a bite or leave the circle. Eventually, only the competitive people with iron stomachs are in the ring, biting the raw, slobbery onion, and fighting to win before they collapse in agony. Why would they do this? To win a game.

That game is a good illustration of the way we can lose sight of what’s important in the heat of competition. You aren’t competing in an onion-eating game, but sometimes we start competing for the wrong goals in marketing.

Measure What Matters

One example of this game is seen in measuring sales. Only looking at the number of sales is losing sight of the most important thing.

Ultimately, the thing businesses compete for is customers who are loyal. Loyal customers will share their confidence in your business with others and add their friends to your growing base of people who keep coming back to buy. Loyal customers give you feedback and help you develop your offerings and services to their maximum potential. Loyal customers keep your sales growing in the future.

A smaller number of customers who repeatedly buy will be more valuable than a larger number of customers who buy once and go somewhere else. What matters in these two groups is the loyalty, not the initial purchase. In the future, this makes the difference in sales.

Competitive intelligence has to measure what matters in all the areas of your business, looking at what those numbers represent in order to analyze them correctly. Otherwise, you might be like the winner of the onion-eating game, wondering why it seemed so important to win.

There’s a lot to be discovered about competitive intelligence at www.reciprocalconsulting.com/competitive-intelligence.php#2

SEO is always going to be an area that changes, and there will always be something to learn as a result of the fluidity. Moz recently came up with a fun way to see what you know (and what you don’t know) about search engine optimization in their New SEO Expert Quiz.

The quiz is randomized so nobody gets the same questions in the same order, and Moz claims it is “astronaut training hard,” but the fifty questions only take about fifteen minutes to answer. The benefit of taking the time to do the quiz is in the results: you are shown the questions with your answer, the correct answer, and a link to learn more about the subject.

This is like a custom lesson in SEO stuff that targets your weak spots. 

Even if you delegate your search engine optimization to someone else, it’s a good idea to keep learning about how it works overall so that you know what you are delegating. Their job may be to handle the details but you should know enough to appreciate what they do for you.

Understanding SEO basics prepares you for using the Internet with confidence, because the codes are no longer gobbledygook to your eyes. This quiz is a fun, nonthreatening way to gauge your SEO expertise and see where you fall in the learning spectrum. You may be pleasantly surprised to find that you know more than you realized and that your guesses in the quiz were intelligent deductions.

If you would like to learn more about SEO visit reciprocalconsulting.com/search-engine-optimization.php.

The word “audit” can bring up some bad memories, but it really is an important process when it comes to keeping your website functioning the way you want it to. This is because it’s like a content tuneup for your site.

Search Engine Journal has a step-by-step explanation of How To Conduct A Content Audit On Your Site that is extremely helpful. It’s a very easy guide worth bookmarking, because content audits should be part of your regular site maintenance just as tuneups are needed to keep a car running smoothly.

If you are not consistently fixing the small problems and replacing outdated items on your site, then it gradually bogs down under an accumulation of minor issues that become overwhelming. This accumulation of minor issues might not seem like much, but getting rid of them usually results in a boost in traffic and rankings.

What might need a tuneup on your site?

  • page title and url
  • description
  • content
  • keywords
  • alt tags
  • last updated
  • internal links

An audit is simply taking a closer look at the individual components of something. In this case, that closer look is with the ability to do something about what you find. Many times a site will have content or links that were good when it was first put up but has expired or needs to be redone. Once a regular content audit routine has been established, it isn’t difficult to keep up because you are only having to fix what has developed since the last time.

No matter how well a website has been designed, it is going to need regular maintenance to stay effective. Content audits are like tuneups for your site to keep it running smoothly. For more information on web design, visit http://www.reciprocalconsulting.com/web-design.php

Recently, Search Engine Journal (SEJ) went through their site and found 9 Noteworthy Social Media Facts in the articles they’ve published and provided links to each one. These facts are noteworthy because they show how social media is becoming one of the most important places to have a presence if you are a business.

  1. in the last six months there’s been an 80% increase in using mobile devices to read email
  2. LinkedIn has 77% of all job postings on its site
  3. one email address can have many Twitter accounts
  4. there was an 800% increase in infographic search volume from 2010 to 2012
  5. the top 24 most-engaged brands on Twitter have more than a million followers
  6. 60 of the top 100 brands on LinkedIn post videos linked to their YouTube channel
  7. 50% of online customers expect customer service on a brand’s Facebook page, but only 23% of brands on Facebook do it
  8. in 3 years, Instagram got 150 million users and grew by 23% in 2013
  9. in 2013 the digital video advertising industry brought in almost $5.8 billion, up 40% from 2012

How do these compare with what your actual online marketing strategies are? You may choose to ignore Instagram, for instance, without any problems, but if your business is on Facebook, you should make sure it is responsive to the “friends” who engage you there.

It’s a good idea to pay attention to social media. Take a quick look at this list and use it as a launching pad to evaluate and renovate your social media marketing campaigns.

When you think about it, social media is just an extension of your customer circle and it makes sense to optimize it. For more information on social media marketing, visit reciprocalconsulting.com/social-media-optimization-SMO.php

People today are bombarded with far more information than they can handle. Any message that catches their attention has to engage them long enough to get a message across, and for many folks, that means a video.

Video combines many levels of communication into one quick presentation. Eyes, ears, and emotional response integrate to send a message to the brain in more than words. This doesn’t mean that video is better than words alone, but it does mean that a message targeting a visceral response might be best presented in video form, but the type of video matters.

For instance, written content scrolling across the screen may have movement and music, but most people are not going to be reading it unless they are already engaged. Who reads the credits at the end of the movie? The people who know somebody who worked on the movie and are looking for their friend’s name.

That same content presented as a short film clip telling a story or a friendly  speaker explaining a process is far more effective because it will connect on more levels. In addition, there’s more for SEO purposes. Rich snippets, video search engines, and link building all add to the increased conversions seen when a good video element is added to a page.

Perhaps the biggest reason videos maximize marketing is that they work the way most of the population operates. We see, we hear, we move in our real world– so we respond to content that is visual, auditory, and kinesthetic.

There’s a lot more on video marketing at  http://www.reciprocalconsulting.com/video-production.php

Pay Per Click (PPC) advertising is an investment of time and money, so you need to know as soon as possible if a particular campaign is successful or not. Search Engine Journal has been talking to different experts in their SEJ interview series and recently caught up with Ilya Lichtenstein from Mixrank to discuss how to run successful PPC campaigns. Here are the highlights from that conversation:

Over 80% of PPC campaigns fail, according to Ilya’s data. So you need to look at leading indicators when you first start a campaign and watch progress with a critical eye. You can usually tell in the beginning if it is going to be in that 80%.

Don’t waste your time tweaking a failing campaign to try and get it going. Good ones don’t start slow most of the time, and failing campaigns don’t resuscitate. You are better off killing the slow starters and investing in the ones that work from the start.

Figure out what makes your successful campaigns work and repeat it. Keep trying until you get some breakout successes and copy the things that work. It will take some time (remember that percentage of failures) but as you find your successful campaigns you will get better at your strategies.

One observation you could make on this advice is that you cannot be emotionally attached to your PPC campaigns. If you have a favorite that is just not taking off, the idea of pulling the plug is painful. But statistically, that failing campaign will not speed up despite anything you try.

According to this expert, you know very soon if your PPC campaigns are going to be successful. And that’s actually good, because you don’t have to waste any time moving on to the successful ones.

For more insights on PPC Management, visit reciprocalconsulting.com/pay-per-click.php

 

Copyblogger just posted an article by a behavioral investigator named Vanessa Van Edwards on nonverbal hacks that can capture attention and convert traffic on your site. It’s an interesting look at human nature and our automatic responses to visual triggers. The reason that nonverbal communication is so important in web design is because people don’t read what doesn’t catch their attention. So the greatest content in the world will go unread by most folks if they don’t notice it.

Research has shown it takes five tenths of a second to make a good first impression online. That means visual rather than verbal is the first thing to pay attention to as you decide how to set up your website. Here are the six wordless ways you can do it:

  1. Understand eye patterns, and set up your headings and buttons in the normal F-shaped way that readers tend to process information: upper left corner, across, down, across, down. This is how we read text in English. (Non-English readers may not automatically do this if their normal script is written right-to-left.)
  2. Photos and videos should show your hands and positive facial expressions. This generates trust without saying a word in any culture.
  3. Guide actions nonverbally with images showing hand gestures or eye directions (looking to the video or button you want them to click).
  4. Utilize the research that has identified where visitors focus: logo, main navigation menu, search box, social networking links, primary image at top of page, written content, website footer.
  5. Take advantage of all the studies on color and psychology and match the colors of your site & logo to the main idea of your brand.
  6. Simple beats over-cluttered every time. Every time.

For more on ways to improve your site’s web design, visit reciprocalconsulting.com/web-design.php

 

“When we think about the future of marketing it’s easy to slip into the trap of thinking purely about technological challenges. However, the truth is that marketing isn’t changing because of technology. Marketing is changing because consumers’ expectations are evolving.”

This quote by Hannah Smith is taken from her post on Moz titled, “Bacon, Burritos, and the Future of Marketing.” It’s an interesting stroll down memory lane if you have been in marketing for any length of time. She moves from keyword density and anchor texts through the various names Google dubbed its tweaks (Vince, Caffeine, Panda, Venice, Penguin, Hummingbird) and the goals of those tweaks. Then there are ads, always an interesting topic.

The predictions made at the end are insightful. It is safe to say we will see more devices being used, which will result in challenges as marketers try to create messages that work across all channels. Analysis becomes even more important since we need to know what is happening during a session and figure out what people are actually doing. This analysis will help with the flexibility that is key to staying strategic, instead of being locked in to one plan of action.

The “out there” prediction in the article, that only brands that stand for something will survive, is accompanied by several illustrations and a challenge: consumers are able to find information and discuss brands on a level that is unprecedented in human history. They are savvy enough to research the brands their friends suggest and expect a seamless experience when they look you up. They also expect a response when they speak and wield great influence on their friends.

What should brands do?

 

A brand must meet the customer’s expectations or they will go somewhere else. And what do customers expect of a brand? A consistent story, a mission and goal, that the brand “stands for something” worth joining. The challenge is that it’s so easy to have that “something” be tarnished as unfavorable information goes viral. With smartphones, friends can find all the dirt while they are in the restaurant talking about it.

This is why reputation management is more than an afterthought. Good online reputation management practice keeps your brand “standing for something” in the eyes of your customers through all marketing changes. 

For more information on online reputation management, visit reciprocalconsulting.com/online-reputation-management.php#2

 

Is your business coming up when someone searches for it? When it comes up, do your hours and location leap to the eye? Can someone see if you have the product they are seeking?

These questions are the ones to ask, according to the latest Google Think Insights Study. Marketing Pilgrim took a quick look at the highlights and here they are:

  • 4 out of 5 consumers use their smartphone (88%) or tablet/computer (84%) to do a local search
  • 50% of smartphone searchers visit the store within a day vs 34% of tablet/computer users
  • smartphone users look for business hours (54%), directions (53%), and address (50%)
  • tablet/computer searchers are interested in availability of product (45%), hours (42%), and address (38%)
  • 60 to 70% of consumers want to search by customizing for city or immediate surroundings

The full Google report on understanding consumer’s local search behavior is here. The takeaway for a business is in making sure that the information — ALL the information — that comes up when someone searches for anything related to their business is accurate, easy to find on the page with a small screen, and links to their home web page for further information like menus or products.

Many people are willing to come to a store to get what they want if it is nearby and they know it is available. This is the advantage local has over online sales, because there’s immediate gratification when you get what you want at the time of purchase instead of waiting for it to be shipped. Your site has to come up in a search, be updated, and easy to navigate or your visitors will go somewhere else.

For more insights on local search and SEO visit reciprocalconsulting.com/search-engine-optimization.php

Sometimes, with all the emphasis on various social media interactions, that old email idea seems somewhat stale. But there is a lot to be said for strategic email marketing:

  • it’s targeted to the people who ask to be on your list
  • it’s private so they are not afraid to respond to your surveys
  • it’s easier to customize so the relationship is cultivated
  • it’s measurable because they can unsubscribe

An email marketing service provider or autoresponder can be a good tool for businesses looking to be efficient and effective with their email strategies. It’s important to think through what you want to accomplish and how your email campaigns fit in with the rest of your internet marketing plans.

When you use email wisely, there is a personalized aspect to your communication that can’t be replicated on any other media. Even tweets and chats lack the ability of an email to have targeted links or promotions, customized coupons, and the potential for content.

But unwise email marketing campaigns are why email has a bad name. Nobody wants bloated junk mail. People get mad when subject lines promise and don’t deliver. It irritates folks when all there is in the body is another version of your ad. If you aren’t going to be sending out email that is worth reading in your customer’s opinion, then you are probably better off not sending out email until you figure out how to do it right.

Email marketing is part of a complete internet marketing strategy. For more insight on how that all fits together, visit reciprocalconsulting.com/internet-marketing-services.php#6

The last time you tried to find something with a search engine, did you think, “which strategic keywords will likely be on the site I want?” or did you think “I want to fix my bicycle so I’ll type in ‘how to fix a bicycle’”?

As someone interested in SEO, you may have been thinking about strategic keywords. Would someone interested in bicycles be thinking about keywords?

Probably not. They’d be thinking about bicycles, and that would be their intent.

Moz just asked some similar questions in Laura Lippay’s article on content strategy, and there’s some great content there along with examples and an interesting string of comments at the end. In Lippay’s view, audience intent wins over keywords as a motivation for content.

For instance, a person interested in bicycles would probably be interested in a site that is a source of bicycle-related ideas, pertinent content, authoritative reference material and discussions as well as a few products and some great humorous memes to share. They come to the site because it has stuff they are interested in (how to fix a bicycle) and come back because it continues to interest them. These interested visitors are more apt to buy what the site sells because there is a history of visits and they trust the site. That’s a win.

To quote Laura Lippay, “It all goes hand-in-hand. When you create something that your audiences like, that they link to more, share more, and engage with more, it’s likely to affect search engine rankings and traffic, too.”

What do you think? Would you agree?

For more on SEO and content, visit reciprocalconsulting.com/search-engine-optimization.php

Twitter has just come out with a study  titled, “Discovering the Value of Earned Audiences — How Twitter Expressions Activate Consumers.” The purpose of the study was to figure out how mentioning a brand in a tweet changes the behavior of consumers, both online and offline.

The three key findings quoted from this study are:

  1. Brands are an integral part of regular conversation on Twitter.
  2. Consumers take action both online and offline after seeing brand mentions in tweets.
  3. The source of a tweet containing a brand mention affects consumer actions.

It’s an interesting study and has a key takeaway for brands: earned media needs to be complemented with both owned and paid messages, because this combination drives greater consumer action and maximizes your return for the efforts you invest in your Twitter strategies.

In plainer language, you need to mix your tweets up by having conversations with your followers as well as the linked posts to your blog and any ads. Which makes sense when you think about it because people might know facts about your brand, but they tend to trust your brand based on a perceived relationship with your customer base and your social media presence.

So tweeting effectively is a combination of using Twitter as it originally started, which is relationship-based, and using Twitter as it is becoming, which is link-based. The people follow the links they trust based on the relationship they have with the tweeter.

One way to do this is monitoring your Twitter account to respond quickly to questions or comments you get and see what develops.

For more information about using Twitter effectively, visit reciprocalconsulting.com/social-media-optimization-SMO.php

Social Media Marketing (SMM) is a necessary tool in today’s world, but it will be a useless tool if your employees are not trained to handle social media correctly. Many reputation management challenges have been created by employees who posted foolish or detrimental things online, and it’s a lot easier to prevent problems than it is to try to repair damage.

Your employee represents your company.

Unless you are a self-employed superpower, you have employees. Most of the time, your customers are interacting with one of them instead of you. Without adequate training, you are hoping your employee makes the right guess about the way you want them to interact.

Many employees have no idea what your SMM plan is or how they are a part of it.

Unless you make sure employees know what is expected of them on social media, they may affect your brand from their own accounts, simply by naming you in an inappropriate post.

If employees handle your social media accounts, they need to have guidelines.

Unless you have clear policies on how quickly questions are answered, how to handle disgruntled complaints, and other online dilemmas; you are expecting that employee to read your mind.

Even if you are paying a professional team to manage your social media marketing, everybody who works for you should be properly trained on social media policies from the day they are hired. The goal of your marketing is bringing in more traffic, and your employees will be the ones handling that traffic. Social media training is an essential part of the process.

For more information on social media marketing, visit reciprocalconsulting.com/social-media-optimization-SMO.php

 

Net Neutrality is a topic that is hard to avoid if you are at all interested in internet marketing (and if you have a web site, you should be interested!) Copyblogger did an excellent job on the subject with Sonia Simone’s article “What Neutrality Means For Your Business, and Why You Need To Act Now To Protect It“.

It basically comes down to the fact that there’s a push to have fast lanes and slow lanes on the internet highway, and it will take a lot more money to go fast. People prefer fast when they are online.

Now, the fight over Net Neutrality is ongoing and nobody knows what will ultimately happen. We each have a small say in the matter, but there’s a lot that is out of a business owner’s control. Nevertheless, there are things that you can control about your site speed.

The way you choose to design your website will affect the speed it will load, which will affect the number of visitors on your site. 

Internet users are usually impatient people. Even a half of a second will make the difference between someone who reads your information and someone who mutters unmentionables and closes the page to go elsewhere. The top things that can slow your site speed are all good things, but you have to weigh the cost:

  • buttons, widgets, forms, and anything that connects to another site
  • ads and the cookies that bloat them
  • images and elaborate themes
  • codes that do things in the background

If the small voices lose the Net Neutrality battle, small business sites may need to pare down to stay competitive. A well-designed site is already important, but in the future it might be vital.

Get expert help in website design at reciprocalconsulting.com/web-design.php

Moz just came out with a list of 2014 Inbound Marketing Trends and, in short, those trends are:

  • SEO is getting more money thrown at marketing automation
  • Content is still king so you need to create a content strategy
  • Social networks are only useful if your target market uses them
  • Mobile marketing needs to be responsive
  • Local mobile searches convert to engagement 88% of the time
  • Email marketing keeps on providing great value for low cost

It’s good to know what everybody else is doing, but just knowing the current trends is not enough. The best thing to do with a trend is use it.

Using a trend takes more analysis, and that’s more work. If all you do is jump on the bandwagon with everybody else, you are reacting instead of responding to the possibilities. Trend analysis is part of the competitive intelligence package because it is figuring out what everybody else is doing.

Using a trend takes that analysis and decides if your unique target market wants to be on that bandwagon. Maybe they do. Sometimes they don’t. You have to have a relationship with them and know them so you can predict accurately.

Using a trend takes a long-term perspective when strategizing. It isn’t enough that everybody else is doing it because you might not want to be where everybody else will be when the bandwagon breaks down. Those who are on the wagon in order to “be on trend” will be stuck because they are focused on that trendy bandwagon instead of where it was going.

If you are using the trend as a vehicle to reach your goals, it’s easy to jump off and keep going when it stops working for you. 

For more information about trend analysis and competitive intelligence, visit reciprocalconsulting.com/competitive-intelligence.php#5

Search Engine Journal highlighted a recent interview with Flipora’s Johnathan Siddharth and it is thought-provoking for anyone interested in internet marketing. Basically, Flipora is blurring the lines between search engine optimization and social media marketing by providing a platform based on recommendations.

“Flipora is proving to be a powerful new engine for discovering and/or marketing content to highly targeted and engaged users. Because the site studies user behavior and provides content based on individual preferences and history, businesses can use it to ensure their content is reaching audiences that are interested in it, and not annoying those who aren’t.”

There are currently about 30 million active users, with another 2 million projected to become active every month. That’s a testimony to the rapid growth of what is essentially a recommendation engine suggesting content based on user’s online preferences and behaviors.

Instead of backlinks and cookies, Flipora analyzes browsing history and matches users with similar histories. It is a way get your content shared with users who are likely to want that content, instead of hoping they find you by typing in the right keyword in a search engine.

This isn’t going to make traditional SEO obsolete, but it is another indication that marketing doesn’t break down into artificial categories with no cross-over. After all, people don’t successfully compartmentalize their lives, so it makes sense that reaching people with your message should be holistic as well.

Your internet marketing is part of your business, true, but the lines are blurred because the components overlap in some ways. The more effectively you integrate and coordinate reaching your customers, the more effectively your business operates.

For more information on social media optimization, visit reciprocalconsulting.com/social-media-optimization-SMO.php

 

Firmology just came out with 3 Common Misconceptions About Online Video Marketing:

  1. it’s too expensive
  2. it won’t resonate with my target audience
  3. it won’t increase sales

That’s three statements said in quite a few business meetings, by any number of executives. How can so many people be making one of these mistakes about video marketing?

If you do the research, you can see the numbers showing how the addition of video to online marketing is making a difference. In March 2014, 187.8 million Americans watched 46.6 billion online content videos, while the number of video ad views totaled 28.7 billion, according to comScore.

It is possible that these three misconceptions just need to be researched to see if they hold true for your own business. If you know your customers, you should know what they’d be interested in, right? If you make a video that is easy to understand when someone tries to watch it (because it is about something they are interested in), it doesn’t need to be expensive, just well-made.

And if you have made videos that are easy to watch and understand, you will get viewers because those videos are about stuff they are interested in, right? The videos might even be shared because they are helpful or entertaining. That means they are resonating with your target audience.

The end result of helpful or entertaining videos will be increased sales because people are coming to your site and they stay to see what else you offer. That’s pretty good marketing, and that’s why video should be part of your internet marketing plans.

For more insight on internet video marketing and production, see reciprocalconsulting.com/video-production.php