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Search Engine Journal highlighted a recent interview with Flipora’s Johnathan Siddharth and it is thought-provoking for anyone interested in internet marketing. Basically, Flipora is blurring the lines between search engine optimization and social media marketing by providing a platform based on recommendations.

“Flipora is proving to be a powerful new engine for discovering and/or marketing content to highly targeted and engaged users. Because the site studies user behavior and provides content based on individual preferences and history, businesses can use it to ensure their content is reaching audiences that are interested in it, and not annoying those who aren’t.”

There are currently about 30 million active users, with another 2 million projected to become active every month. That’s a testimony to the rapid growth of what is essentially a recommendation engine suggesting content based on user’s online preferences and behaviors.

Instead of backlinks and cookies, Flipora analyzes browsing history and matches users with similar histories. It is a way get your content shared with users who are likely to want that content, instead of hoping they find you by typing in the right keyword in a search engine.

This isn’t going to make traditional SEO obsolete, but it is another indication that marketing doesn’t break down into artificial categories with no cross-over. After all, people don’t successfully compartmentalize their lives, so it makes sense that reaching people with your message should be holistic as well.

Your internet marketing is part of your business, true, but the lines are blurred because the components overlap in some ways. The more effectively you integrate and coordinate reaching your customers, the more effectively your business operates.

For more information on social media optimization, visit reciprocalconsulting.com/social-media-optimization-SMO.php

 

Firmology just came out with 3 Common Misconceptions About Online Video Marketing:

  1. it’s too expensive
  2. it won’t resonate with my target audience
  3. it won’t increase sales

That’s three statements said in quite a few business meetings, by any number of executives. How can so many people be making one of these mistakes about video marketing?

If you do the research, you can see the numbers showing how the addition of video to online marketing is making a difference. In March 2014, 187.8 million Americans watched 46.6 billion online content videos, while the number of video ad views totaled 28.7 billion, according to comScore.

It is possible that these three misconceptions just need to be researched to see if they hold true for your own business. If you know your customers, you should know what they’d be interested in, right? If you make a video that is easy to understand when someone tries to watch it (because it is about something they are interested in), it doesn’t need to be expensive, just well-made.

And if you have made videos that are easy to watch and understand, you will get viewers because those videos are about stuff they are interested in, right? The videos might even be shared because they are helpful or entertaining. That means they are resonating with your target audience.

The end result of helpful or entertaining videos will be increased sales because people are coming to your site and they stay to see what else you offer. That’s pretty good marketing, and that’s why video should be part of your internet marketing plans.

For more insight on internet video marketing and production, see reciprocalconsulting.com/video-production.php

 

 

Over on Search Engine Journal, Bill Belew has come up with The New Definition of Search Engine Optimization. He might be being a bit sarcastic, because he shares that most people don’t know the OLD definition of Search Engine Optimization. In fact, most of the people in his audiences just stare when he asks for one. Here’s his definition:

Search Engine Optimization is creating good content on a web site in the form of pages and posts that real people want to read, which satisfies the query AND can be found by a search engine. In that order. Readers first!

So what does this look like? It looks like the writer focuses on good content that has these 8 characteristics:

  1. is served up with a title that promises to satisfy a query.
  2. is original and delivers early on the promise of the title.
  3. has images that are relevant to the query and are also searchable.
  4. is consistently on topic within the site where it is found as evidenced by internal links.
  5. appeals to other like-minded sources with relevant external links.
  6. is recognized as such by other credible sites as evidenced by backlinks.
  7. is sometimes timely.
  8. is sometimes timeless.

The result will be good content that is found when people look for it because the keywords are logical and it’s on the first few pages of the results. It’s clicked on because the title looks like it will answer the question, read because it is well-written, shared because it is relevant, and optimizes your site’s reputation.

What do you think? Is this how you’d define SEO? You’ll find more information on the subject at reciprocalconsulting.com/search-engine-optimization.php

Your web site is the way many of your customers first get to know what you offer and how it will benefit them. Ideally, that site comes up on the first page of a search engine (SEO, we are looking at you!), but the experience a first-time visitor has on your home page will determine whether or not they come back.

How is your message displayed and delivered? Today’s multi-device using customers are using laptops, phones, and more, to read email, surf the net, and view ads. A clear technological understanding of how that works and what won’t work should define how your message is put out there. For instance, a dancing bunny with wiggly balloons to click on is actually difficult to program successfully because a lot more information is needed and more can go wrong. That same bunny sitting still might be better for your purposes.

Is your web site easy to figure out on different devices? Since there will be users with varying speeds and bandwidths, simple is better than flashy. A good search engine is essential. The home page should have the most commonly sought information right there, easy to see. Tabs or links for further information should also be easy to see and should work when clicked on. Get feedback from your customer base and use it to improve their experience on your site no matter how they visit.

Are you using your data dynamically? There’s more to metrics than click rates. If you aren’t analyzing the right data for the right information, you are simply learning how to play with software and numbers. Know what makes a result statistically significant and numbers start to mean something real. Today we have access to an overwhelming amount of unique data that can improve specific business practices, but it has to be handled correctly.

You could try to figure all this out by yourself, or you could delegate the bulk of it to professionals who already are doing successful web design for others. 

http://www.reciprocalconsulting.com/web-design.php

 

PPC is different than SEO because you are in more control of where your ads land. Where Search Engine Optimization is intelligently relying on keywords and algorithms, Pay Per Click advertising relies on intelligently paying for prime placement on a page.

This is an equally valuable tactic in marketing because it allows you to target specific audiences by location, interests, associations, and more. You are not only waiting for results to develop, you are being exposed as soon as your ads are live and able to adjust immediately as it’s called for when the market changes. This instant feedback is an important aspect of pay per click advertising.

Most reputable internet advertising firms will monitor referring links in order to eliminate fraudulent clicks. This is done to keep their clients from having to pay for clicks that are generated by competitors hoping to increase your expenses or site owners hoping to get paid a commission. Fraud may be inevitable, but professionals will work to avoid affecting their client’s investment by eliminating the source of the fraud.

PPC can be a defined budget item because even though you pay per click, you can set parameters in maximum spending per month. This is very attractive to those new to pay per click advertising. It’s also easy to track the various types of ads so you can see which are more effective and should be enhanced. Most businesses utilize both SEO and PPC; they are different tactics for marketing and are considered equally important.

For more information on the potential benefits of PPC, a good resource is reciprocalconsulting.com/pay-per-click.php

In the middle of listing Link Building Tips That Actually Work, Tina Courtney-Brown suggests that you let your competitors determine where your links come from:

“Just as your metrics tell a very poignant tale, so do the results of your competitors. Research where they receive the majority of their links from, and the methods employed to gather these links. This analysis will also help you to identify ideal partnerships.”

That’s a valid observation for link-building, but competitive intelligence analysis adds even more depth to the things you can learn from your competitors. One way that really sticks out is by learning from their mistakes. If you can do this, your competitor has “paved your way” by making it easier to avoid the problems they ran into or the blind spots they may have.

Learning from someone else’s mistakes requires an understanding of their perspective, and a recognition of your similarity. In competitive intelligence terms, you would get that from developing a familiarity with their business and how it operates. This isn’t trade secrets, but things like reading their blogs, looking at their websites, and analyzing public data on their performance. After a while, that understanding of your competitor allows you to see where they made some mistakes.

But seeing someone else’s mistakes is useless unless you actually do learn from those mistakes. This is how your competitor can pave your way, because you can strategize how to avoid those mistakes, and compete intelligently. Your business will make the same mistakes unless you recognize the similarities and figure out an alternative plan of action.

Competitive intelligence is a lot easier if you get expert, professional help. You’ll find it at reciprocalconsulting.com/competitive-intelligence.php#6

 

By this time, just about everybody that has been online has heard about Heartbleed, the devastating superbug that looks like it has turned internet security upside down. Mashable has created a hitlist of the passwords you need to change “right now” and some experts suggest you just go through all your passwords and change each one anyway. But there is an added factor for businesses, and that is your online reputation and the security of your websites.

Even if your sites were not affected by the Heartbleed bug, you need to reassure your customers with reliable proof that your sites are safe. If you were affected, it’s better to say so and explain what you did to fix it. It wouldn’t be out of line to contact your customers with that statement and a link to one of the “check for Heartbleed” sites out there where they can run yours through and check other sites as well. That does two things: they know what is going on and they have a tool to use.

This isn’t an issue that will be going away soon. For every day people read about it but get no information from you to reassure them your business is safe, that is a whole 24 hours for folks to worry, talk, and decide to take their business somewhere else. Proactive strategies to deal with the current situation help you now and they give you a reputation for integrity that will be useful the next time something like this happens.

If you need help figuring out what to do about your online reputation management strategies, you can get that help at reciprocalconsulting.com/online-reputation-management.php#3

Whatever your business is, there are some assumptions that can probably be made:

  • you came up with an idea that meets a need or want
  • you came up with a way to make that idea a real product or service
  • you developed a business plan to make the product or service available
  • you don’t do every aspect of your business yourself

In order to be successful, everybody eventually has to delegate. The best way to delegate is figuring out which things can be done by another person, finding people capable of doing the tasks to your standards, working with them to make sure there’s no questions, and being available if questions come up in the future. There are a lot of things that can be delegated by a business owner, including internet marketing.

You could invest a lot of valuable time understanding the way the Google algorithm has changed over the years, for instance, and figure out how to stay on top of all the details involved with SEO, PPC, SMM, WD, and VID. Or you could delegate that to professionals who make a career of it and invest your valuable time in understanding your unique spot in the market and managing your business effectively. Then, you are able to deliver when the increased demands come as a result of professional internet marketing.

Delegation doesn’t mean you have no control or input. It means you don’t have to do the time-intensive tasks related to the job so you employ someone else to do it to your standards. Your time is best invested in doing the things that only you, the business owner, can do.

For full service internet marketing, consider delegating that to professionals – reciprocalconsulting.com/internet-marketing-services.php#2

 

Over on SiteProNews, Mark Garland has listed 50 Top SEO and Link Building Tips You Need To Be Using. Before his list, and it’s a good list, he makes some very good points about SEO.

  • links for links sake won’t get you very far
  • the only way to rank high is by genuine links to genuine sources
  • nobody outside Google’s inner sanctum knows exactly what the algorithm is
  • we do know that Google prioritizes relevant, high quality sites

So we need to be thinking of our content as the primary focus, and links as highlights of that quality content.

“Think of it in terms of the top 40. A song reaches the number one spot if it sells the most (for SEO purposes sales = links) but you can’t just take a collection of words, with no melody and try and get sales. In order to get to number one you have to start with a good song (for SEO purposes song = content). The song may not be to everyone’s liking but as long as a large enough number of people like it, then they will buy (or link to!) it.”

Marketing techniques, Search Engine Optimization, Web Design, and all the rest of the package really are useless if the song/content doesn’t appeal to anybody. Being an authority with easy-to-find information goes a long, long way to get your site ranked high. It’s the song most people want to hear, and you will find that your links are shared by quite a few people.

If you need help getting yourself into the “top 40″ and staying there, there’s help at reciprocalconsulting.com/search-engine-optimization.php.

 

Search Engine Optimization has been around for quite some time; long enough to go through an evolutionary process that has changed the way internet marketing is done. The goal of being on the first page of the search engine remains the same, but the method has changed as search engines used new algorithms to determine how to prioritize findings. It’s a constantly changing puzzle that keeps professionals challenged.

Social Media Optimization is the new kid on the SEO block, promising great things and looking easier to deal with than the arcane formulas of traditional search engine optimization. But is it an either/or situation? Of course not. Neither one is a magic bullet that will maximize your marketing goals. Both SEO and SMO are tools that need to be used skillfully in order to work well, and they should both be in your marketing toolbox.

SEO will be used to bring your business up in the ranks of a search engine. Since search engine algorithms are trending toward using social media input, SMO starts getting important in search engine optimization. But while there’s an overlap, social media optimization has a completely organic side based on human nature. The way you optimize your social media is by engaging people in an ongoing relationship. A first-time customer might find you from an internet search or from a “share” from a friend on a social media site. That is the beginning of the acquaintance and it grows through interchanges that increase familiarity and connection.

Optimizing your business means you use the technology at your disposal to develop the relationships with your customers that result in a loyal base you can rely on for future transactions. If you only have been thinking of SEO, you need to add SMO to your toolbox so you have the advantages of using both. If you need help with your social media marketing tools, you’ll find it at reciprocalconsulting.com/social-media-optimization-SMO.php.

 

In the middle of a great post at Moz on mobile-friendly websites, Bridget Randolph points out;

“We are increasingly living in a multiscreen, device-agnostic world.

And this means that “mobile” can’t just be an add-on anymore…Mobile is not a separate channel; it’s a technology. So although at this point there’s “no such thing as mobile” for the user, don’t be fooled: Making it easy for users is really hard. We can’t be lazy. What we need to be doing is asking the right questions.”

Her advice covers 4 phases of the customer journey: discover, explore, buy, and engage. Each category has a lot of good ideas to consider, case studies to look at, and it is set up in an easily read format that is classic technique portrayed. You could use it as a textbook example of how to explain a potentially complicated process.

Every time you add a channel to your enterprise, it is a good idea to do it in a way that works for the devices that will be used to access it. Mobile devices are different in experience than a laptop, for instance. So why would it be wise to take the laptop design to the mobile device without changing anything? Short answer: it isn’t.

So how does that look for web design? It looks like using dynamic serving, different HTML based on user agent while a single URL is used for simplicity. You want to be thinking about the consumer’s experience, and that means a smaller screen needs a different design in order to be effective.

  • How easy is it to find the “order” button from a phone?
  • How hard is it to navigate your site on a tablet?
  • Can the user go from one device to another in a seamlessly synced experience?

Testing all the devices your customers use, the way your customers use them, is a very good idea. We live in an increasingly multi-device, mobile-savvy culture and business has to keep up with it by designing your site appropriately for all the channels your customers will access. You can get help with your web design at reciprocalconsulting.com/web-design.php.

Some business owners struggle with what images they should post on Pinterest, particularly if they don’t own an e-commerce business or don’t sell physical products. The truth is, it doesn’t matter what kind of business you have. You can still make use of Pinterest.

Here are 5 ways to make your Pinterest pinboards more interesting:

  1. Pin your instructional videos or images associated with your podcasts. You can always pin the pages where your videos are posted in YouTube.
  2. Take pictures of your customers and employees interacting and upload those to Pinterest. Alternatively, take pictures of your employees behind the scenes (at office parties, industry events, etc.) and upload those to Pinterest.
  3. If you own a brick-and-mortar store, upload pictures of new products in your inventory when they come in. A great way to do this is to take pictures of your employees putting them on the shelves.
  4. For service businesses, you can pin images from around the Web that showcase problems that your staff can fix. For instance, an auto mechanic might pin an image of an overheating radiator. Be sure that you pin images on websites that have a Pin button so that you don’t run into potential copyright issues.
  5. Pin work you do for clients or supporting documents around the Web that back up claims you make on your blog. Infographics are very pinnable.

Need help with your Pinterest account or another social media account? Get Pinterest help at reciprocalconsulting.com/social-media-optimization-SMO.php

Some of the most important metrics for pay-per-click advertisers are ad positioning metrics. These can include but are not limited to:

  • Click-through rates
  • Visitors
  • Pages per visit
  • Average duration on site
  • Conversion rates

Each of these PPC metrics weighed against your ad position can help you save money on your advertising budget. One important way this happens is by gauging your metrics for each ad position relative to other ad positions.

For instance, if you discover that your CTR for position three is higher than your CTR for position one or two, then that’s a huge benefit. But what if your conversion rate is higher for position two?

You have to determine what metric is more important for you in reaching your goals.

If you are not concerned with conversion rate but are concerned with a higher engagement with your visitors, then you might look at your pages per visit and average duration metrics. Adjust your budget to target your ad to the optimal position so that you can reach the highest engagement possible for your ads.

This is no easy task. It does require keeping an eye on your ads and performing some tests to determine the best position for the goals you want to reach.

You can get started with ad position adjustment by consulting with Reciprocal Consulting at www.reciprocalconsulting.com/pay-per-click.php

Blogs have been around for a long time and it’s amazing that there are still a lot of people who don’t know how to comment on them. You’ll see comments like “Nice post. I learned a lot,” or “Thanks! Great post.”

Okay. Why bother?

If you want to get someone’s attention, write a comment they’ll remember. Take issue with what they’ve said. Disagree. Not in a combative way, but don’t be afraid to state your own opinion and back it up with a fact or two.

You can even create a great comment by agreeing with the author. Instead of saying “Nice post,” how about saying something like, “I agree with that. In fact, I read another post on the same subject the other day at Such-and-Such blog where the author went into detail about statistics and included a couple of infographics. The interesting thing was …” and give a couple of sentences on why you thought the post was interesting.

Those kinds of comments have value. They are more likely to get someone’s attention and keep the conversation flowing.

Many people are still treating blog commenting as a spam pool. Quit trying to get links from other people’s blog posts with crappy, spammy blogs. Join the conversation and add some value. Otherwise, you’re just wasting your own time.

Learn more about online marketing at http://www.reciprocalconsulting.com/.

Last week, a popular guest blogging network got stung hard when Google slapped them with a penalty. And now, guest bloggers are running for cover. But should they be worried?

We’re big fans of link building around here, and guest blogging isn’t a bad deal either. But if your purpose for guest blogging is to build hundreds of links back to your website, then you’re doing it wrong.

Guest blogging isn’t about the links. It’s about your brand. It’s about putting your brand in front of a potential audience and attracting that audience to your website so that you can build a relationship with them. What matters is how you do that.

So how should you go about guest blogging?

Start with identifying blogs that attract the same type of reader you want to attract. You want a blog with a high percentage of crossover in terms of your audience. The audience for your target blog may be interested in the same types of products and services that you offer.

Read up on that target blog’s content guidelines. Do they accept guest posts? If so, how do they want to receive them?

Follow the guidelines for your target blog to a tee. Don’t concern yourself with anchor text links in your bio or relevant dofollow links. Write high quality content that is valuable to the target blog’s audience. Above all, add value to the site you are guest blogging for.

Instead of linking to your site using anchor text in your bio, link to your site using your brand name or using the URL.

Guest blogging is about adding value, not building links. If you do it well, you’ll get the recognition you deserve.

Webmaster Academy is a school run by Google designed to help new webmasters learn how to build an effective website and get it indexed in the world’s largest search engine. It’s a useful course, but I wouldn’t expect to learn everything there is to know about building a website if I were you.

The three newest modules in the academy are:

  • How to make a great site that is valuable to your audience
  • How Google sees your website
  • How to communicate with Google about your website

All of this is useful information to new webmasters, but there is more to building a website than making it look pretty and getting it indexed in the search engines (although, both of those are good places to start).

You also need to concern yourself with accuracy of content, navigational issues, whether or not your site is accessible to mobile phones, and the importance of keeping it updated. That’s just to name a few of the important details webmasters should concern themselves with on every new website.

It’s a lot harder to build an effective website than it used to be. There is a lot more to think about. I wouldn’t trust it to an amateur.

To learn more about how to build an effective website, visit http://www.reciprocalconsulting.com/web-design.php.

There is a practice going around called Twitterjacking. It is essentially using other people’s tweets, hashtags, and other Twitter marketing strategies to draw attention to your business. It’s controversial, but it can also be powerful if you don’t overdo it or misuse it.

The first step is to find popular Twitter users and hashtags in your niche and follow them for a while. Get a feel for what they tweet about before you do anything.

If opportunities arise, interact with these power users. Ask them questions or respond to their tweets. Focus on building a relationship first. You can even retweet some of their most interesting or useful tweets.

After you’ve built a solid relationship, tag along on one of the popular hashtags that are gaining traction. Rising hashtags are great opportunities. Make sure your tweet is relevant to the hashtag and to your audience. If possible, mention the originator of the hashtag or the associated brand by @ sign and name.

This practice, if done well and unannoyingly, will usually net you a few extra followers every time you use it. Just don’t abuse it.

Retweets, hashtags, and even favorites are all subtle but powerful ways you can hijack Twitter to attract a little attention to your brand.

An infographic at Marketing Pilgrim illustrates five obvious trends in search engine optimization. One of those trends is that social signals are increasingly leading to higher search engine results for marketers who are active on the social networks.

These social signals include:

  • shares
  • likes
  • retweets
  • +1s
  • comments
  • followers and fans
  • and other social signals such as total reach and influence

What this means for search marketers is that you should spend a little bit of time each day on social media, sharing your content and interacting with your audience. This will likely become more and more important as the search engines place greater emphasis on these social signals.

In the old days, marketers built content and tried to get as many links as they could to that content with the right amount of anchor text and other link building signals. Today, it’s all about the social signals, and we’re talking about more than those that lead to links.

There are a handful of social media websites that are most important in helping marketers increase their social influence. These include:

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • LinkedIn
  • Pinterest
  • YouTube
  • Instagram

While these are not the only sites worth mentioning, I’d say they are a bare minimum. You may not need to be on all of them, but you should establish a presence on most of them. And be active.

Social media marketing is as good as SEO. Learn more about social media optimization at reciprocalconsulting.com/social-media-optimization-SMO.php.

Internet marketers debate about some of the stickiest things. One of the big debates going around right now is whether you should write long, well-researched blog posts or shorter posts geared toward driving more traffic to your blog.

There are advantages to doing it both ways. One advantage to long, in-depth blog posts is that it gives you a chance to prove your authority.

An advantage to shorter posts is that you get more opportunities to rank well in the search engines and drive more traffic back to your blog through social media engagement. Both of these values are important. Our take is it never hurts to have more blog posts as long as you have a strategy. On the other hand, longer blog posts don’t hurt either. But you have to decide whether you want to spend your time writing your blog or servicing your customers.

When it comes to blog marketing, you have to do what is right for your business and your customers. What does your audience want?

Answer that million dollar question and it will tell you whether you should do a lot of research and write long blog posts or write short snippets. I’ve seen bloggers succeed with both strategies. You have to play to your audience.

At Moz, Cyrus Shepard shares 12 powerful ways to optimize for Google traffic without building links. It’s a great list, but I’d like to focus on just 5 of those optimization tactics and show you how you can put them to good use in simple ways.

  1. In-depth articles – You don’t have to be a news publisher to take advantage of this markup, but you should take a cue from popular news websites like Huffington Post and the New York Times. Use pagination, Google Authorship, canonicalization, and paywalls more effectively.
  2. Rich snippets - Google is adding more and more rich snippets all the time. You can use them for reviews, videos, events, books, articles, and much more. This is advanced SEO.
  3. Google Authorship – Google Authorship means having your photo appear in search results, which gives you a higher authority rating and potentially more click-throughs for your content.
  4. Local SEO – Cyrus Shepard mentions internationalized SEO, which is great, but what about local SEO? If you’re a local business, then you want to drill down.
  5. Social annotations – Simply sharing your content on Google+ is enough to increase your SEO potential. Your content will show up in more search results, even among people who are not in your network, but it will definitely appear at the top of the search results for people who are in your Google+ network.

Implementing these tactics won’t necessarily increase your search engine results or get you more traffic, but not implementing them will definitely hold you back.

Get more information on the best SEO tactics at http://reciprocalconsulting.com.